Lingua Romana

The place to discuss your conlangs and conlanging.

Re: Lingua Romana

Postby Delano » Wed 06 May 2009 4:34 am

Neqitan, can you as a Spanish speaker understand Romana? I want speakers of all romance languages to be able to understand it ;) . I'll write a sentence or two and you can take a shot at translating them. Also, if you don't mind, can you put the Spanish equivalent?

La mea sorore ave una testa magno.

Eram amato de toto mundo.
Delano
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:46 am

Re: Lingua Romana

Postby ILuvEire » Wed 06 May 2009 4:49 am

Delano wrote:Example (1) : Il pero e la pela sun balando al ritmo de la musica (The boy and the girl are dancing to the rhythm music)

Italian: Il ragazzo e la ragazza ballano al ritmo della musica.

Example (2) :Il vostro cano sta crasso. (Your dog is fat)

Il vostro cane è grasso.

It's really not awfully similar to Italian. Not much more than Spanish at least.

Delano wrote:La mea sorore ave una testa magno.

La mia sorella ha una testa granda. (If I understand magno right. Also, why isn't magno marked as feminine?)

Eram amato de toto mundo.

"Amare" di tutto mondo.
What's "Eram"

Also, why do you always do verbs just like English?
dansk - italiano - esperanto - Deutsch - português - tiếng Việt - עברית - ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i - ελλινικά - العربية - 中文 - íslenska
User avatar
ILuvEire
 
Posts: 332
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 10:42 am
Location: Austin, TX, USA

Re: Lingua Romana

Postby Neqitan » Wed 06 May 2009 5:31 am

Delano wrote:La mea sorore ave una testa magno.

My "sorore" has a big(?) head(?)
Mi "sorore" tiene una gran cabeza.

I imagine "ave" means to have because Medieval Spanish used aver for "to have"... I imagine "testa" means "head" because I don't remember what Romance language uses tete (or similar) for "head". Magno... I imagine it's related to magnífico, "...magnificient?" Sorore loses me though.
Delano wrote:Eram amato de toto mundo.

"They were loved by all the world"?
"Eran amados por todo el mundo"?

Spanish 3rd person plural conjugations end in vowel + n, so I imagine that -m in "eram" might be related to that.
User avatar
Neqitan
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Fri 17 Apr 2009 9:59 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Lingua Romana

Postby Delano » Wed 06 May 2009 1:35 pm

[quote] La mia sorella ha una testa granda. (If I understand magno right. Also, why isn't magno marked as feminine?)


Sorry for my mistake concerning "magno", I wasn't paying close enough attention to gender agreement. Romana has two words for large, they are "magno" and "grande". I chose "magno" to throw you off, I'm really trying to test the intelligibility of Romana.

]
Delano
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:46 am

Re: Lingua Romana

Postby Delano » Wed 06 May 2009 1:44 pm

"Sorore" means sister, as in la mea sorore (my sister). Think of the English word sorority when you've forgotten what "sorore" meant. The Classical Latin term for head was "caput". This word survives in modern day Spanish as "cabeza". Italian and French favored Vulgar Latin over Classical Latin in several aspects. Their words for head are "testa" and "tete" respectively. A derivation of the words "caput" exist in standard Italian today as "capo", this word is used to indicate the head of something or a captain.
Delano
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:46 am

Re: Lingua Romana

Postby Delano » Wed 06 May 2009 1:51 pm

Also, why do you always do verbs just like English?



I not quite sure what you're referring to. Could you be more specific ;) ?

Non ho capito, tutti i verbi sono accurato, no?
Delano
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 9:46 am

Re: Lingua Romana

Postby ILuvEire » Wed 06 May 2009 6:46 pm

Delano wrote:
Also, why do you always do verbs just like English?



I not quite sure what you're referring to. Could you be more specific ;) ?

Non ho capito, tutti i verbi sono accurato, no?

Never mind, sei corretto. :P
dansk - italiano - esperanto - Deutsch - português - tiếng Việt - עברית - ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i - ελλινικά - العربية - 中文 - íslenska
User avatar
ILuvEire
 
Posts: 332
Joined: Sun 19 Apr 2009 10:42 am
Location: Austin, TX, USA

Previous

Return to Conlangery

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 2 guests