Koikkatuun

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Koikkatuun

Postby tigerlily » Sun 25 Jul 2010 3:39 pm

This is Koikkatuun, my most recent conlang.
The grammar will be almost exclusively borrowed from Finnish (with major simplifications in the cases and verb tenses), while most of the vocab with be from either a Germanic or Romance language.

The Alphabet - Aafabetta

A /ɑ/
Ä /æ/
B /b/
D /d/
E /ɛ/
F /f/ or /ɸ/, /f/ before ‘r’; /ɸ/ everywhere else
G /g/
H /h/
I /i/
J /j/
K /k/
L /l/
M /m/
N /m/
O /o/
P /p/
R /r/
S /s/
T /t/
U /u/
V /v/
Y /ø/ or /y/, /y/ being more common

If a vowel is long, like in Finnish the vowel is doubled when written.
Ex-
Sa (you) v. Saa (Hey!)

There are two exceptions-
The letters 'e' and 'o' add diaeresis instead of a second glyph.
Ex-
Ben (short form of Benjamin) v. Bën (fiber)

Note: be careful not to morph /ɛ:/ into /e/ or /e:/ when lengthening it.

Just like vowels, consonants can be lengthened with an additional consonant.

Hune (wind) v. Hunne (to the left of)


Stress will almost always fall on the penultimate syllable, with a few exceptions:
-If the word has three syllables, the stress falls on the first.
Ex- Koikkatunn

-Some verb declensions will throw the stress off in some persons when conjugating, but that will be discussed in the verb section.
Last edited by tigerlily on Sun 25 Jul 2010 4:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Native: American English (Texas accent)
Semi-Proficient: German
Mildly Educated: French
Future: Spanish, Finnish, Russian
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Re: Koikkatuun

Postby tigerlily » Sun 25 Jul 2010 4:01 pm

These are the noun and pronoun cases.
They will be like Finnish, except that I created fewer, and I chose the endings I found more aesthetic and played with them to suit my idea of what this language sounds like.

There are 5 cases.

Nominative is the subject of the sentence.
This case receives no ending, except in the plural, in which the last vowel is changed to 'i' if existent. If the word ends in a consonant, an 'i' is added.

Jove / Jovi
(Man / Men)

Dom / Domi
(Cathedral / Cathedrals)


The Accusative is used for the direct object of verbs.
This case takes -(e)n for the singular, and -(i)s in the plural.
The vowels in parenthesis are for when the word ends in a consonant in the Nominative.

Joven / Joves
Domen / Domis


The Dative is used for the indirect object of a verb, and when pronouns are in this case, with a verb conjugated for this pronoun in the nominative, it is reflexive.
Also, when a verb has a direct object that is a human being, and there is no indirect object, the direct object would instead be in dative case.

Ex- I call her.
'Her' would be in dative, as this is a person, and the sentence lacks a direct object.

This case takes -(i)tti for the singular, and -(i)tta for the plural.

Jovetti / Jovetta
Domitti / Dometta

(Note: the stress remains on the penultimate.)


The Genitive is used to show possession, and is translated into English with the preposition 'of'.
This case also states origination (I am from America), condition (He is a man of valor), and is used also as a partitive (I want three cakes).

This case takes -(i)ssi in the singular and -(i)ssa in the plural.

Jovessi / Jovessa
Domissi / Domissa

(Note: the stress remains on the penultimate.)


The Locational case is used to state basic location. There are three general locations marked by this case: 'in', 'at', and 'on'. All other locations and prepositions use the next case.

This case takes -(o)nne in the singular and -(e)nna in the plural.

Jovenne / Jovenna
Domonne / Domenne

(Note: the stress remains on the penultimate.)


The Prepositional marks that the word is being affected by a preposition, which are used almost always instead as postpositions, after the word in the Prepositional.

This case takes -(a)vat for singular and -(e)vet for plural.

Jovevat / Jovevet
Domavat / Domevet

(Note: the stress remains on the penultimate.)



And those are the cases.

Let's talk about word order for the cases.

If a word is in the Genitive, it comes after the word which is describes.
'Tallo massi' = 'My house'

The Genitive of 'ma' is after the Nominative of 'tallo'.

And as stated above, most prepositions are used as postpositions.
The only exceptions are 'hunne' (to the left of), 'sore' (to the right of), and 'la' (in between) which are used before the word in the Prepositional.
Native: American English (Texas accent)
Semi-Proficient: German
Mildly Educated: French
Future: Spanish, Finnish, Russian
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