Idioms in Conlangs

The place to discuss your conlangs and conlanging.

Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Alaric08 » Mon 21 Jun 2010 1:03 am

I noticed there did not seem to be a thread about conlang idioms, so I guess I'll just have to start it! I've always been fascinated by the way idioms reveal something about our collective psyches...

Here are some Folkish idioms:
Ig kennist itt es mein namme (I know it like my name, meaning one is knowledgeable about the subject)
Itt'st regneth in troppen (it's raining in armies, it's raining a lot)
Alaric08
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed 12 Aug 2009 2:28 pm

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Alisbet » Mon 21 Jun 2010 12:58 pm

The traditional idiom of my conlang ceorzani is as follows: tirasema silwana arete d'ama.
Translated it means: The warrior silwana returns home.
Power of People is stronger than People in Power.
Alisbet
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun 30 May 2010 5:07 pm
Location: Finland

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Vilņa » Fri 15 Jul 2011 1:33 am

Here is a couple in Værí:
Hévulis porļara ávet isacam. Translation: Hell's gates have opened. Meaning: This is going to be very bad.

Nam Narûv Resta ut rétius. Translation: And King Narûv will return. Used as an expression of sarcasm.
Native: English
Fluent: Lingua Latina
Learning: Re en Kam, Κοινὴ Διάλεκτος ( Ἑλληνικά)
Plan to learn: Ænglisc, Русский Язык, मानक हिन्दी, संस्कृतम्, Gaeilge
Conlangs: Værí, Savih Tāvūṇ, Agínwas Biþar, Bi'dimall
User avatar
Vilņa
 
Posts: 33
Joined: Thu 26 May 2011 3:16 pm
Location: Vilņa, Erator, Ránus, the Earth, the Solar System, Orion-Cygnus Arm, The Milky Way, the Local Group

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Elijah » Thu 02 Feb 2012 6:37 pm

Toi hopekare namaja neseemus.
3ps river-against walk-INF attempt-PRES.PROG-3pm
He's trying to go upriver - a hopeless cause
Native: American English
Learning: Mandarin, Burmese, Japanese
Want to learn: Cantonese, ASL, Basque?
Elijah
 
Posts: 96
Joined: Sat 28 May 2011 7:24 am
Location: Colorado in the US

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Vojta » Mon 09 Apr 2012 11:16 am

Alaric08 wrote:I noticed there did not seem to be a thread about conlang idioms, so I guess I'll just have to start it!


Oh, we have them!

See here at the end of page: http://www.neoslavonic.org/lessons/11

cheers
============
Vojtieh, the conlanger
Neoslavonic language, Slavic conlangs
http://www.neoslavonic.org, http://IZVIESTIJA.info
============
User avatar
Vojta
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Tue 11 Aug 2009 11:30 pm
Location: Prague, Czech Republic, E.U.

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Tikolm » Fri 01 Jun 2012 3:05 am

Tikolmian has something about slipping on a banana peel, but I forget how it goes and what it means. Oh well, off to hit the hay. See you later. Be back when I have the idiom pinned down.
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Tikolm » Tue 12 Jun 2012 2:05 am

Tikolm wrote:Tikolmian has something about slipping on a banana peel, but I forget how it goes and what it means. Oh well, off to hit the hay. See you later. Be back when I have the idiom pinned down.

Here it is: zo xususuol lepas-is lemoxos rusayo (ibok).
[the banana-possessive skin-on step-inf many-time over]
Literally, it means "to step on the banana peel many times over". It's equivalent to "spinning one's wheels" or "going nowhere fast". The missing part is the idea that you're trying to not slip on it but you're just going to anyway no matter how many times you try. Also, ibok is unnecessary. The meaning isn't lost if you leave it out.

I just came up with this today. The original one is probably lost.
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Tikolm » Sun 15 Jul 2012 12:36 am

We haven't got any idioms in Leafoosish yet, but there is a saying: e'se bly fasil de ddir egyll ce dde sumeter se. It corresponds to the English "easier said than done", but the literal meaning is "it's easier to say needle than to submit [to one]". (I think you can guess what the reference is here -- what kind of needle do you "submit to"?)
And if you think that's dark and dreary on my part, you should see this thread!
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Tikolm » Fri 27 Jul 2012 11:06 pm

Tikolm wrote:We haven't got any idioms in Leafoosish yet, but there is a saying: e'se bly fasil de ddir egyll ce dde sumeter se. It corresponds to the English "easier said than done", but the literal meaning is "it's easier to say needle than to submit [to one]". (I think you can guess what the reference is here -- what kind of needle do you "submit to"?)
And if you think that's dark and dreary on my part, you should see this thread!

Please, if you will, forget that. It was my feeble attempt at being imaginative and not just parroting the Welsh saying "haws dweud mynydd na mynd drosto" (easier to say mountain than to go over it, for anyone who's missed the discussions where it came up).
Since then, I've come up with an idiom that's only used in the three languages of Cymrygath, a city in the south of Llyffw. It's pretty much always the same: aler tros in Cymrygath Leafoosish (a dialect of my conlang), mynd dros (mynt tros' in the local "pinyin") in Cymraeg y cathod, and aller troche in the local French. It means literally "to go over", and it's a euphemism for "to steal". The fact that I came up with this is a sign that I've spent too much time thinking about the aforementioned mountain.
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Re: Idioms in Conlangs

Postby Tikolm » Thu 09 Aug 2012 4:14 pm

I've decided that the Leafoosish version of the mountain saying is ply fassil a ddír yfw ce atandre son ofrase ("easier to say door than to wait for it to open"). That's because they're cats and they hate closed doors.
Edit: And in case anyone's wondering what "Cymraeg y cathod" is, it's just a really weird dialect of Middle Welsh that's spoken by a few imaginary cats. It's not a conlang (as yet). If it were a conlang, I would probably refer to it by its native name, cymrāc y càith.
Native: English
Fluent: français
Basic: Cymraeg
Really basic: Español, lingua latīna
Conlangs (current): tikolmil, llyffws, Arliks, dilir
(Website is at http://risteq.net/ if you ever want to visit. It's supposed to be in 4 languages.)
User avatar
Tikolm
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon 10 Aug 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Sylvara, Massachusetts

Next

Return to Conlangery

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests