Atükan

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Re: Atükan

Postby linguoboy » Fri 11 Jun 2010 1:29 pm

Kloiten wrote:xShadowx: Take a look at [veən] and [kʰeət̚]. Those are pronounced something on the lines of (assuming the é is pronounced like in Standard French) vé-uhn and ké-uhn. That's probably not what you say (I, for one, have never heard that before. I think it's something eastern).

Well, if "eastern" to you means "east of the Mississippi". That's classic Northern Cities Vowel Shift. (I live in Chicago.)
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Re: Atükan

Postby XshadowX » Fri 11 Jun 2010 5:36 pm

Kloiten wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
XshadowX wrote:A : IF this is in pronunciation the a is pronounced like it is in van or cat.

Like [veən] or [kʰeət̚]? Well, that's simple enough!


I guess that's why I asked xShadowx for his/her dialect... I assume it's a SAE [æ], but you never know, eh?

xShadowx: Take a look at [veən] and [kʰeət̚]. Those are pronounced something on the lines of (assuming the é is pronounced like in Standard French) vé-uhn and ké-uhn. That's probably not what you say (I, for one, have never heard that before. I think it's something eastern). That's the beauty of IPA: it's easy, practical, and gets over dialectic diaspora.
I was asking you about your dialect because it's crucial in understanding how your language sounds like. Not everyone speaks English the same. For all we know on the net, you could be Scottish. And that would screw things up for those that are Americans here. You can at tell us the region in which you live. For example, if you were to tell us that you live here, we would know that you more or less speak a very neutral type of American English. Even then we can't be sure, because everywhere there's always a person who has an accent of some sort. I, in my Pacific substituting-t-as-a-coda-with-a-glottal-stop vowel-heightening Northwest, have found people as young as kindergartners who speak with a fluent "British" accent despite never having been anywhere near the Islands their whole life.


I live in the south eastern region. In North Carolina to be exact.
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Re: Atükan

Postby kaenif » Fri 11 Jun 2010 5:50 pm

XshadowX wrote:I live in the south eastern region. In North Carolina to be exact.

[æjə] :?:
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Re: Atükan

Postby Kloiten » Sat 12 Jun 2010 6:20 am

linguoboy wrote:
Kloiten wrote:xShadowx: Take a look at [veən] and [kʰeət̚]. Those are pronounced something on the lines of (assuming the é is pronounced like in Standard French) vé-uhn and ké-uhn. That's probably not what you say (I, for one, have never heard that before. I think it's something eastern).

Well, if "eastern" to you means "east of the Mississippi". That's classic Northern Cities Vowel Shift. (I live in Chicago.)

Holy crap, I just realized that many PNE speakers say [veən] and [kʰeət]. I guess I have heard that before. But I more commonly hear the standard [æ], though.

Edit: PNE speakers usually say [kʰ(eə/æ)ʔ] instead. No joke. It's not even an unreleased [t].
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Re: Atükan

Postby Kloiten » Sat 12 Jun 2010 6:27 am

kaenif wrote:
XshadowX wrote:I live in the south eastern region. In North Carolina to be exact.

[æjə] :?:


Southern Drawl... mmm, that would make Atükan sound... um, interesting.
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Re: Atükan

Postby linguoboy » Sat 12 Jun 2010 6:38 am

Kloiten wrote:Holy crap, I just realized that many PNE speakers say [veən] and [kʰeət]. I guess I have heard that before. But I more commonly hear the standard [æ], though.

Edit: PNE speakers usually say [kʰ(eə/æ)ʔ] instead. No joke. It's not even an unreleased [t].

The rules of æ-tensing are different in Philly (and neighbouring areas) than they are for the Great Lakes area where the NCVS takes place. There's actually a phonemic split there, e.g. [kʰeən] "tin" vs. [kʰæn] "be able". In Broad Chicawga, by contrast, these are both [kʰeən] ~ [kʰɪən].
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Re: Atükan

Postby Kloiten » Sat 12 Jun 2010 6:44 am

linguoboy wrote:
Kloiten wrote:Holy crap, I just realized that many PNE speakers say [veən] and [kʰeət]. I guess I have heard that before. But I more commonly hear the standard [æ], though.

Edit: PNE speakers usually say [kʰ(eə/æ)ʔ] instead. No joke. It's not even an unreleased [t].

The rules of æ-tensing are different in Philly (and neighbouring areas) than they are for the Great Lakes area where the NCVS takes place. There's actually a phonemic split there, e.g. [kʰeən] "tin" vs. [kʰæn] "be able". In Broad Chicawga, by contrast, these are both [kʰeən] ~ [kʰɪən].

I may be fooling myself, but I think the tin-be able to distinction is the exact same in PNE. If I hear [kʰæn], it's very well more likely that it means can. So they're not homophones after all!
It still confuses the hell out of my Russian parents, though.
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Re: Atükan

Postby XshadowX » Sat 12 Jun 2010 2:02 pm

Kloiten wrote:
kaenif wrote:
XshadowX wrote:I live in the south eastern region. In North Carolina to be exact.

[æjə] :?:


Southern Drawl... mmm, that would make Atükan sound... um, interesting.


Nope. The letters and everything is exactly how they are pronounced in the pronunciation key.
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Re: Atükan

Postby linguoboy » Sat 12 Jun 2010 5:25 pm

XshadowX wrote:Nope. The letters and everything is exactly how they are pronounced in the pronunciation key

...in a North Carolina accent. Which sounds drawly to those of us not from there.
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Re: Atükan

Postby XshadowX » Sat 12 Jun 2010 6:18 pm

No. what I mean is is that the language itself is different from the way I acctually speak. So in a way I guess, Atükan is it's own dialect.
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