Nezemeş for beginners!

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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby Talib » Sun 04 Oct 2009 10:12 pm

shreypete wrote:Yes, it does :) (Unfortunately, I cannot entirely read Arabic). In Turkish, Uighur, Kazhak and Uzbek, it means "law".

Hukuk is typically used in very formal situations or used to describe a very important law. The common word is kaenun, also meaning law.

so Hukuk and Kaenun mean the same thing. So you've learnt two new words already :) (one derived form Arabic and Turkish, while the other derived from Persian).
Both are ultimately from Arabic, my second language - حقوق and قانون.

Which languages do you speak? Your conlang reminds me a lot of Turkish, so I'm guessing you're familiar with it.
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby shreypete » Sun 04 Oct 2009 10:51 pm

well actually I'm of mixed heritage (Portuguese-Indian, quarter Persian and quarter Uzbek) but my maternal grandfather is from Uzbekistan and he speaks Uiyghur, which belongs to the Turkic group so that's the reason I'm more familiarized with the Turkic grammar and vocabulary (although Nezemeş also uses lots of Persian vocabulary...which becomes more transparent as one will see).

But I believe Persian is related to Arabic in terms of vocabulary ,and Turkish is related to Persian in the same aspect (and this is how it's also indirectly related to Arabic). I came across several Persian words which I think are derived from Arabic:
mamnun (mamnoon in turkish),
motashakeram,
ketab (in turkish - kitap),
selamlaykum,
taelib,
moallem,
arzu,
enterzar,
ayni (also in turkish),
bismil,
berdevam,
devran,
gayet,
hapishane etc.

By the way, just out of curiousity, does your id mean "student"?
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Re: Nezemeş for beginners!

Postby Talib » Mon 05 Oct 2009 12:23 am

shreypete wrote:well actually I'm of mixed heritage (Portuguese-Indian, quarter Persian and quarter Uzbek) but my maternal grandfather is from Uzbekistan and he speaks Uiyghur, which belongs to the Turkic group so that's the reason I'm more familiarized with the Turkic grammar and vocabulary (although Nezemeş also uses lots of Persian vocabulary...which becomes more transparent as one will see).
Wow, you have a very diverse heritage. Interesting.
But I believe Persian is related to Arabic in terms of vocabulary ,and Turkish is related to Persian in the same aspect (and this is how it's also indirectly related to Arabic). I came across several Persian words which I think are derived from Arabic:
mamnun (mamnoon in turkish),
motashakeram,
ketab (in turkish - kitap),
selamlaykum,
taelib,
moallem,
arzu,
enterzar,
ayni (also in turkish),
bismil,
berdevam,
devran,
gayet,
hapishane etc.
Neither is related to Arabic (or to each other) but both have borrowed lots of Arabic words. All of those are Arabic except the last four don't look like they are (I'd have to see the original spelling to be sure.
By the way, just out of curiousity, does your id mean "student"?
Yes. It's spelled طالب

I don't mean to derail your thread too much, by the way!
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RE: "Nezemeş"

Postby VROOR » Sun 08 Nov 2009 11:07 am

Greetings and Salutations.

I have a deep interest in the Nezemeş language of which, I have the following questions about the language's vocabulary and grammarical rules:

Q1. Is there a meaning to the language name, the word "Nezemeş"?

Q2. In the word-combo "anyasahukukeşlarmelgidemlekler", what rule defines the usage of "m" as the vowel-harmony for the word "melgide"?

Q3. For the vowel-harmony of "melgide" and "lek", would it be equally possible to say "melgidellekler"
or "melgiderlekler"?

Thank You for the Time and Reading.
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Re: RE: "Nezemeş"

Postby shreypete » Mon 14 Dec 2009 4:42 am

VROOR wrote:Greetings and Salutations.

I have a deep interest in the Nezemeş language of which, I have the following questions about the language's vocabulary and grammarical rules:

Q1. Is there a meaning to the language name, the word "Nezemeş"?

Q2. In the word-combo "anyasahukukeşlarmelgidemlekler", what rule defines the usage of "m" as the vowel-harmony for the word "melgide"?

Q3. For the vowel-harmony of "melgide" and "lek", would it be equally possible to say "melgidellekler"
or "melgiderlekler"?

Thank You for the Time and Reading.


Hey there Vroor, I'm glad you like Nezemeş. It means the "language of mystery". meş is language while nez means mystery and the e is used for vowel harmony.

2) Well, m is a consonant so it wouldn't really be defined under vower-harmony. However, the vowels can modify some consonants...but in most cases they only modify words by either adding or deleting another vowel.

Example where another vowel is deleted: sakindeş - loyalty can became sakindeşedımlaren - loyalty of human beings/people. The vowel "e" here basically is added for vowel harmony. But adding the "e" also deleted the "a" from adlımlar (people) because the two cannot exist together.

Example where another vowel is added: zamlartı - freedom; zamlartızadlımlaren - freedom of human beings/people. Here "z" is added. The easiest rule is: whenever you have "ı" or an "e", in most cases, you just add the first letter of the word as long as it's a consonant.

In both the examples above, "en" is appended to the end meaning "of" of indicating the Genitive case.

3) If you use rule no. 2 now that I've explained, which is, using the first letter as long as it's a consonant (in this case m), you have to use that letter making it: melgidemlekler. But you're right in one way. In conversational speech, the m can be omitted and be pronounced as "melgidellekler" to keep the rhythm.

I hope that helped :)
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Re: RE: "Nezemeş"

Postby VROOR » Mon 14 Dec 2009 7:18 am

shreypete wrote:I hope that helped


Yes, your response has helped a lot; thank you. I am still looking forward for more lessons and introductions on the Nezemeş in the near-future, please do continue presenting the language.
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