The Life of Esperanto

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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Sushika » Fri 29 Jan 2010 10:14 pm

Delodephius wrote:Your right, it was a bit out of line. I just never met any Esperantists before.

Mi estas ĉi tie. I'm here. :D
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby formiko » Sat 30 Jan 2010 2:01 am

Sushika wrote:
Delodephius wrote:Your right, it was a bit out of line. I just never met any Esperantists before.

Mi estas ĉi tie. I'm here. :D


I would say Jen mi!

@Talib: I learned both Spanish and Russian at 11, but I always had a passion for languages, since I was 9. I discovered Esperanto when I was 12. (I am 39 now)

Mi elkovris Esperanton dum mia dekdua jaro. Mia najbaro kaj amiko parolis la rusan, kaj por vespermanĝi ĉe lia domo, mi devis lerni rusan. (Krome, lia fratino belis! )
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Talib » Sat 30 Jan 2010 2:09 am

formiko wrote:I learned both Spanish and Russian at 11, but I always had a passion for languages, since I was 9. I discovered Esperanto when I was 12. (I am 39 now)
And how long have you been fluent in it?

And how the heck did you learn Russian at that age!
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby formiko » Sat 30 Jan 2010 7:26 am

Talib wrote:
formiko wrote:I learned both Spanish and Russian at 11, but I always had a passion for languages, since I was 9. I discovered Esperanto when I was 12. (I am 39 now)
And how long have you been fluent in it?

And how the heck did you learn Russian at that age!


I'd say about 5 years. I got reacquainted with Esperanto about 5 years ago.
I was never fluent in Russian, but my new neighbor came straight off the boat from Russia, so to eat dinner over their house, I had to learn Russian! Plus his sister Tamara was cute :)
больше борщ,пожалуйста Image Image
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Kloiten » Mon 01 Feb 2010 8:02 am

formiko wrote:
Talib wrote:
formiko wrote:I learned both Spanish and Russian at 11, but I always had a passion for languages, since I was 9. I discovered Esperanto when I was 12. (I am 39 now)
And how long have you been fluent in it?

And how the heck did you learn Russian at that age!


I'd say about 5 years. I got reacquainted with Esperanto about 5 years ago.
I was never fluent in Russian, but my new neighbor came straight off the boat from Russia, so to eat dinner over their house, I had to learn Russian! Plus his sister Tamara was cute :)
больше борщ,пожалуйста Image Image


That's really cool. I want to be as fluent in so many languages as you are.

By the way, it's not correct to leave борщ in the nominative. You need the genitive/partitive case in this case. So: (По)больще борща, пожалуйста. I just put in по- because it sounds better, but either way goes.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Talib » Mon 01 Feb 2010 10:05 pm

Sigh ... I really want to learn Russian, but it puts me off knowing побольше борща, пожалуйста is pronounced [pəbɐlʲˈʂe ˈborɕːə pɐˈʐaɫstə] when I want to say [poˈbolʲʂe ˈborɕtɕa poʐaˈlujsta].
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby linguoboy » Tue 02 Feb 2010 5:38 am

Talib wrote:Sigh ... I really want to learn Russian, but it puts me off knowing побольше борща, пожалуйста is pronounced [pəbɐlʲˈʂe ˈborɕːə pɐˈʐaɫstə] when I want to say [poˈbolʲʂe ˈborɕtɕa poʐaˈlujsta].

Learn Ukrainian. What you see is what you get--no pesky vowel reduction there!
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby formiko » Tue 02 Feb 2010 7:16 am

linguoboy wrote:
Talib wrote:Sigh ... I really want to learn Russian, but it puts me off knowing побольше борща, пожалуйста is pronounced [pəbɐlʲˈʂe ˈborɕːə pɐˈʐaɫstə] when I want to say [poˈbolʲʂe ˈborɕtɕa poʐaˈlujsta].

Learn Ukrainian. What you see is what you get--no pesky vowel reduction there!


If you want to learn a "cyrillic" language, I'd advise Bulgarian/Macedonian. My friends says it is simple in comparison. I can understand 75% of a Bulgarian conversation just from my knowledge of Russian alone.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Delodephius » Tue 02 Feb 2010 11:58 am

South Slavic languages have a highly phonetic orthography. Serbian and Macedonian in particular.
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Re: The Life of Esperanto

Postby Talib » Tue 02 Feb 2010 8:26 pm

Russian is the only Slavic language that uses the Cyrillic alphabet which interests me, aside from maybe Serbo-Croat. I'd rather learn Polish or Czech.

Ukrainian is just weird.
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