Heterijo

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Heterijo

Postby Kotoba_Azul » Mon 03 Aug 2009 1:03 am

Here are the phonemes and a few greetings from my new constructed language, Heterijo.

VOWELS:
O: Like Japanese “kotoba,” or Spanish, “eso,” except when accented, in that case like the OUGH in “dough,” but without the double-u-ing at the end of the syllable. U: Stronger than the two O’s in “boot” when accented; when not, it’s pronounced with the lips unrounded, like a Japanese U. A: like the A in cat, except when accented, in that case it’s like the A in father. E is always like the E in “set.” “I” is always like the two E’s in beep, but shorter and crisper.

So:
O, Ŏ (or Oq)
U, Ů (or Uq)
A, Ā (or Aq)
E
I
As you can see, I created an alternative to an accented character when typing or writing in an informal situation. The Q’s job is only to accent the O, U, or A, it never does anything else.

CONSONANTS AND DIOHTONGS IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER:
K: Just a normal K sound.
H: Long and aspirated.
L: Really exaggerated, like an Italian L.
R: Slightly rolled, but dragged out like an English R when at the end of a syllable.
M: Normal M.
N: Normal English N.
Ń: Extremely nasalized. (Also can be written N’)
P and B: Like they would be pronounced in any European language, just not as explosively.
F: Very strong, but short.
D: Nothing special, just a hard D.
T: Made with the tongue touching the top of the mouth.
J: Like a French J.
G: Hard, hard, HARD. Every vowel after this one is automatically stressed.
Y: Like the Chinese way of saying a Y, with a slight J.
Dj: Like the J in the English word “Jam”.
V: Pronounced like Soft, with very little rounding of the lips, but still some.
S: As in soft.
C: Like the Ch in “chance.”
Z: As in zigzag.
Dz and Ts: Pronounced how they appear, Dz like a Chinese Z, Ts like a Japanese Ts.
X: Like they French Ch, but a little harder.
W: Pronounced like a German W.
Ckh: Pronounce like Hebrew Kh.

GREETINGS:
Lemme know if you it's cheesy to have drink names in your greetings. :D

Hā yůtyā- Said around breakfast time, literally “Happy milk.”
Hā xā- Said around lunch time, literally “Happy tea.”
Hā torlihovi- Said around the early afternoon snack time. “Happy juice.”
Hā jůfej- Said around dinner, which is in the mid evening. “Happy wine.”

Grammar coming soon!
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Twix93 » Mon 03 Aug 2009 10:34 am

Hā yůtyā- Said around breakfast time, literally “Happy milk.”
Hā xā- Said around lunch time, literally “Happy tea.”
Hā torlihovi- Said around the early afternoon snack time. “Happy juice.”
Hā jůfej- Said around dinner, which is in the mid evening. “Happy wine.”


Good idea :D I like that.

L: Really exaggerated, like an Italian L.


Do you mean like the Italian "LL", because I don't think a single L in Italian is exaggerated.

V: Pronounced like Soft, with very little rounding of the lips, but still some.


Which letter do you mean? Like the "f" in soft?

It's always a good idea to show phonology in IPA - but I understand if you don't know it. It just makes it clear - for example I don't know what the "KH" sound in Hebrew is.
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Re: Heterijo

Postby kaenif » Mon 03 Aug 2009 10:57 am

O: /o̞/ (I can't get the modifier to show up grr, always appears as a box)
Ŏ: /o/? (/ə/ in RP English? o_O)
U: /ɯ/
Ů: /u/?
A: /æ/
Ā: /ɑ/
E: /e/
I: /i/

K: /kʰ/, initial k in English?
H: /ħ/?
L: /ll/?
R: /ɾ/, ending /ɹ/?
M: /m/
N: /n/
Ń: /nn/?
P and B: /p/, /b/
F: Very strong, but short. (?)
D: /d/
T: /ʈ/?
J: /ʒ/
G: still /g/?
Y: Like the Chinese way of saying a Y, with a slight J. (Which "Chinese"?)
Dj: /ʤ/
V: Pronounced like Soft, with very little rounding of the lips, but still some. (?)
S: /s/
C: /ʧ/ (h, or no h? :P )
Z: /z/
Dz and Ts: Chinese z is /ʦ/, but I think you want /ʣ/. and /ʦ/.
X: Like they French Ch, but a little harder. (?)
W: /v/
Ckh: /χ/?


I am not very sure about it :P I don't know much on IPA
The greetings are very special :D I think Haq xaq sounds fun XD
Can you recognise this character?
Nope, it's not shāng. It is a 囧 with a hat which 囧ed its chin off!
囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧囧!
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Kotoba_Azul » Mon 03 Aug 2009 12:24 pm

Thanks for liking my greetings, guys.

And sure, like an LL.

And that "Soft" thing was a misunderstanding. You know how kids these days say "like" all the time? "It's pronounced, like, soft, or whatever."
I meant it's like a soft W, like in Japanese. :D

And Y as it would be in Mandarin, I guess. Just think of a language where the Y is drug out, and that's what my Y sounds like.
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Wed 05 Aug 2009 5:42 am

The greeting idea is interesting, but I'm not sure that it would have evolved those particular associations of beverages with particular times of day.
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Kotoba_Azul » Wed 05 Aug 2009 6:44 pm

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:The greeting idea is interesting, but I'm not sure that it would have evolved those particular associations of beverages with particular times of day.


I don't know exactly what you mean. If my con-nation drinks those beverages at those times of day, then the greetings make sense, no?

I suppose that once I'm done engineering my grammar, I could come up with alternatives to those greetings. This is my first conlang, and it's really hard.
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Kotoba_Azul » Wed 05 Aug 2009 7:37 pm

This post is sort of lengthly, so don't read it if you don't have time. Also let me know if you think I should give my grammar a revision to add some flair or to work out a problem that may occur.
Also, if this is too similar to someone else's work or your work, PLEASE let me know so I can change what needs to be changed. That is, unless you don't care.

MORPHOLOGY:

Nouns:
Nouns have three genders; masculine, feminine, and neuter (spelling?). Masculine nouns tend to end with an unaccented U, and feminine with an I. Neuters usually end in consonants. Of course, there will be irregularities.
Nouns pluralize by the addition of an N at the end of the noun. UN or IN for gendered nouns ending with consonants. EN for neutral nouns ending in a consonant, VEN for those ending with a vowel.

Articles:

Definite
Singular | Plural
Lo | Lon
Li | Lin
Lei | Leyen

Indefinite
Singular | Plural
O | On
I | In
Dje | Djen

Examples:
Boy= Kopu
Girl= Kopi

Lo kopu, li kopi. Lon kopun. Lin kopin. O kopu, On kopun, I kopi, In kopi.

Embryo= Cimbikop
Lei cimbikop, leyen cimbikopen, dje cimbikop, djen cimbikopen.

Pronouns:
M=Masculine F=Feminine
Sto- I(M) Stei- I(F) Ston- We(M) Stin- We(F)
Eko- You(M) En’i- You(F) Ekon- You all(M) En’in- You all(F)
Do, Dono- He, they(M) Jei, Jeni- She, they(F)

Only use the feminine form if only females are in the group. One male plus 1000 females equals the masculine pronoun.


Verbs:
Verbs, like in IE languages, conjugate for the subject. All infinitives have AK at the end. Verbs stems can end with either a vowel or a consonant, and it will not necessarily conjugate differently. Verbs are either regular, or irregular. No stem-changing ones.

Infinitive verbs:
Palak- To walk
Korak- To run
Luktak- To eat
Fyurak- To drink
Remove the final AK, and VOILA; the stem.

Simple present conjugations:

Singular | Plural
Sto -ok | Ston -oqn’
Eko -aki | Ekon -aqn
Do -aqraq | Dono -aqran

Add the isolated particle “Ne” after the verb to make it simple past.
Add the particle “Fe” to make it negative. Fe always comes before ne.
Guess what “Dono koraqran fe ne,” means.
To make a verb future tense, add “Ci” BEFORE the verb.
Dono ci koraqran fe OR Ci koraqran fe= They won’t run.
It’s important for me to note that the stressed syllable is the next to last one.

Adjectives:
Adjectives must agree with the gender, or lack thereof, of a noun. Most adjectives can change gender; others, like “Haq” are totally neuter. Adjectives come before nouns. Adjectives don’t pluralize. Some adjectives may not have a neuter form for whatever eason I decided it wouldn’t, so the feminine form would be used.

Omamu= Sleepy
Lo omamu kopu= The sleepy boy.
Lin omami kopin= The sleepy girls.
Lei omami cimbikop= The sleepy embryo.

Adverbs:
Add the particle “Ke” before an adjective to make it an adverb. That’s all there is to it. Adverbs are always either gender neutral, or feminine. I think adverbs should be as simple as possible.

Lo kopu palaqraq ne ke omami= The boy walked sleepily.

Challenge-
1. How do you say, “I drank a juice.”?
2. How do you say, “I will run happily.”?
3. How do you say, “The sleepy girl didn’t eat.”?
4. Conjugate every verb I mentioned.

Next post, I'm going to talk about word order, grammar particles, and show some vocabulary! I'm not ready to create the more complex verb conjugations yet.
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Twix93 » Wed 05 Aug 2009 11:16 pm

Nice conlang and interesting grammar 8-) - Well explained.

I thought I'd have ago at the first three for the translation challenge:


1. Sto fyurok i torlihovi.
2. Sto ci korok ke haq.
3. Li omami kopi luktok fe.
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Dan_ad_nauseam » Thu 06 Aug 2009 4:29 am

Kotoba_Azul wrote:
Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:The greeting idea is interesting, but I'm not sure that it would have evolved those particular associations of beverages with particular times of day.


I don't know exactly what you mean. If my con-nation drinks those beverages at those times of day, then the greetings make sense, no?

I suppose that once I'm done engineering my grammar, I could come up with alternatives to those greetings. This is my first conlang, and it's really hard.


I"m thinking from historical principles. Milk as a breakfast beverage, and juice as an afternoon beverage, seem unlikely unless refrigeration is available when the language starts developing.
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Re: Heterijo

Postby Kotoba_Azul » Fri 07 Aug 2009 7:07 am

Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:
Kotoba_Azul wrote:
Dan_ad_nauseam wrote:The greeting idea is interesting, but I'm not sure that it would have evolved those particular associations of beverages with particular times of day.


I don't know exactly what you mean. If my con-nation drinks those beverages at those times of day, then the greetings make sense, no?

I suppose that once I'm done engineering my grammar, I could come up with alternatives to those greetings. This is my first conlang, and it's really hard.


I"m thinking from historical principles. Milk as a breakfast beverage, and juice as an afternoon beverage, seem unlikely unless refrigeration is available when the language starts developing.


Since when is refrigeration a necessary precept to the concumption of milk?

And good job, Twix. :) But you forgot the particle "ne" for past tense.
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