Togruti

The place to discuss your conlangs and conlanging.

Togruti

Postby choc_pud » Sun 06 Apr 2014 8:43 pm

Hello chaps and chapesses! I know this is perhaps a tadge abstract, but bear with, I think it could be worthiful.

I've always been rather keen on Star Wars, and particularly on the species of sentient life known as the Togruta. They have a language known as Togruti, and I've been unable to find any info on it at all anywhere, besides a brief and vague mention on the "Wookiepædia".

So I decided to have a go myself, but I've come up with so many possible variants that I amn't sure how would best it be to proceed. Has anyone any suggestions?

The only information I have been able to find is from this link: http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Togruti

Please feel free to have a look and to comment with any ideas!

choc_pud
Dyfal donc a dyr y garreg, ydy?
User avatar
choc_pud
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri 21 Sep 2012 12:53 am

Re: Togruti

Postby choc_pud » Sat 03 May 2014 5:30 pm

Take that as a no then...?
Dyfal donc a dyr y garreg, ydy?
User avatar
choc_pud
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri 21 Sep 2012 12:53 am

Re: Togruti

Postby Khunjund » Fri 01 Aug 2014 8:10 pm

The problem with inventing a language for aliens such as these is that their different physiology would render their language impossible for humans to speak. If you'd like to create a language using what little information we have, though, I suggest distinguishing many different vowel qualities, having voiced and voiceless versions of all possible trills (bilabial, alveolar, and uvular) — possibly with syllabic versions —, and distinguishing multiple lengths of the aforementioned trills and vowels, maybe two lengths with (consonantal) trills, and at least three with vowels (and syllabic trills). I also recommend making the language tonal, so that long vowels (trills) can have tones alternating repeatedly between high and low, to simulated the "tremors" mentioned in the wiki. The actual grammar is up to you; I don't know much about the Star Wars universe. I would personally go for an isolating language.
Native: français.
Fluent: English.
Learning: Deutsch, 日本語, العربية, Ἡ Ἑλληνικὴ φωνή.
Interested in: 한국어, русский, polski, Brezhoneg, 漢語, suomi, isiXhosa, Gaeilge, עברית.
Khunjund
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed 19 Sep 2012 10:13 am

Re: Togruti

Postby choc_pud » Wed 06 Aug 2014 11:46 am

Wow, thanks very much! You've thought of a lot of stuff I hadn't at all. Fortunately, Togruta are almost identical in physical aspect to humans, and so any language of theirs would be fairly easy for a human to pronounce (or at least, no harder than any human language would be).

I had thought about making it tonal, but I have quite a problem with pronouncing tonal languages at speed, which would be necessary for me to really get to understand the language. I might have another go though. And clicks, I also included four clicks. I can't quite remember what they were, but I felt they weren't really in keeping with the rest of the phonology, so I removed them.

In my original version I think I included about twelve different trills, including the raised alveolar trill found in Czech, but it ended up becoming too dull to be interesting. Also, I think the bilabial trill has got to be one of the least attractive sounds in any language (that and /ʒ/!), so I tend to avoid it.

One thing which interested me (and this is where I show my incompetence!), is whether there is any human language which differs between phonemes by having them take tones. What I mean is, is there any natural language which could differentiate between an alveolar trill, say, spoken at a very high pitch, versus one at a more normal pitch? I included this, as well as 'high', or 'sung' alveolar lateral approximant, in my original version of Togruti. From what you've been saying though, I think I might reinstate it.

As for the grammar, I've created so many different versions of Togruti by now that I've used almost every form I can! At present I've got it as a slightly inflectional language with noun declensions for nominative, accusative, sociative, benefactive and vocative case. The pronoun system is relatively simple, and these also inflect to indicate various forms in a similar way to the nouns.

Another thing which I've used almost every possible form is with the writing system. Nowhere is Togruti ever shown written down, so I've got pretty much free reign to come up with something. I've used alphabets, syllabaries, alphasyllabaries, abjads, even phonologograms! But I want to make it interesting different from the ones on Earth, so I'm a bit stumped. I don't suppose you have any suggestions there?

Changing the subject now, I see you've only just joined the Omniglot forum. So welcome! Hopefully you'll find it as useful and inspirational as I have. :-D
Dyfal donc a dyr y garreg, ydy?
User avatar
choc_pud
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri 21 Sep 2012 12:53 am

Re: Togruti

Postby Quantum » Wed 06 Aug 2014 2:56 pm

FYI, this forum is notoriously barren of posters.

If you'd like more frequented feedback for your project(s), and you haven't already done so, try some of these fora:

The New Conlang Bulletin Board
The Zompist Bulletin Board (I believe started by Mark Rosenfelder, if you're familiar with Almea at all)
Conlangs at Unilang
Department of Creativity at Anthologica

The last two are also pretty slow on the uptake, but definitely less so than here. Well, Anthologica maybe more so ;P

Also, other helpful resources can be found at The LCS Resources, The LCS Communities. and Software tools for conlanging.

There are probably others, but I'm too lazy to post them here. Remember: Wikipedia and Google are your friends ;P
Quantum
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon 26 Aug 2013 6:25 pm

Re: Togruti

Postby choc_pud » Wed 06 Aug 2014 8:04 pm

Thanks for those links, I'm registering with a couple of 'em as I speak! (Or type, or whatever.)
Dyfal donc a dyr y garreg, ydy?
User avatar
choc_pud
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri 21 Sep 2012 12:53 am

Re: Togruti

Postby Khunjund » Fri 08 Aug 2014 10:01 pm

Well, about how this forum is being deserted, the only thing we can do about that is to keep posting, isn't it?

When creatures have different physiologies, the slightest, most unnoticeable difference could potentially render one race's language impossible to speak for another race. But anyway, who cares?

To pronounce a tonal language quickly, all you can do is practice. With practice, you'll start to pronounce the tones more accurately and fluently (try to not focus on how melodious your voice sounds: the point is to talk, not to sing on pitch — I say this because this is the problem I have with tonal languages). As for the clicks, if you had four of them, I assume they were dental, lateral, (post-)alveolar, and palatal. If you put them back in, you might consider removing the palatal click (pronouncing it correctly takes practice…), or adding the bilabial one.

How in the world did you get twelve trills? Please don't tell me you had creaky-voiced and breathy-voiced ones on top of the voiced and voiceless ones — those would be a nightmare to distinguish! And they would limit your tones. I agree with you on the bilabial trill, but if the wiki says they had loads of trills, you should consider having it, even if you make it rather rare. I disagree with you on /ʒ/ — it's one of my favorite sounds in French (it sounds especially good before a nasal vowel).

Real languages don't, to my knowledge, distinguish tones in their consonants, but any trill or approximant can be syllabic, i.e. serve as a syllable nucleus, like a vowel, in which case it can have any register or contour tone a vowel can.

There's no problem in making an inflectional language, but I think you'd be doing yourself a disservice by creating a fusional language. I would recommend an agglutinative one, if you don't like isolating languages.

One of the most used writing systems for conlangs is the abugida, so you wouldn't be very original amongst conlangers if you chose that. However, they look very neat and are a good balance between ease of use and visual complexity. I wouldn't use an abjad, because they don't work well with very vocalic languages. A logographic system is always neat, but takes a lot of work to create. I think the most logical choice, considering the language, would be an alphabet, however unoriginal that may seem. If you want to enhance the visual complexity of the script, you could mark tones explicitly with diacritics (above or below the letters), have different letters for long vowels or syllabic trills, and have many different typographical ligatures.

Thank you for welcoming me. Actually, the main reason I signed up was to help other people, not to find inspiration for myself, but if I can pick up a few good ideas, that would be great!
Native: français.
Fluent: English.
Learning: Deutsch, 日本語, العربية, Ἡ Ἑλληνικὴ φωνή.
Interested in: 한국어, русский, polski, Brezhoneg, 漢語, suomi, isiXhosa, Gaeilge, עברית.
Khunjund
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed 19 Sep 2012 10:13 am


Return to Conlangery

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest