Name the language

Here’s a recording of a number of phrases in a mystery language. Do you know of can you guess which language it is and where it’s spoken?

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This entry was posted in Language, Quiz questions.

0 Responses to Name the language

  1. Daydreamer says:

    I’m tempted to say that this language is spoken in Southeast Asia. Could it be Lao?

  2. prase says:

    Sounds like Japanese.

  3. PP says:

    prase it doesn’t sound like japanese. If I should guess, I would say thai.

  4. BG says:

    (Without looking) It is a tonal language, probably Sino-Tibetan. I am guessing a Chinese language (not Mandarin).

  5. Podolsky says:

    Hmong?

  6. Like Daydreamer above wrote, it looks like something from Southeast Asia… I would say Vietnamese.

  7. TJ says:

    Don’t forget Cambodian

  8. Simon says:

    This language is spoken in Southeast Asia, but isn’t Sino-Tibetan.

  9. It sounds like Thai to me, which to answer the second question is spoken in Thailand.

  10. hallo says:

    khmer?

  11. Ian says:

    It is central Thai and my translation of it is…

    “A model sentence to study ‘What time shall we meet to go out? Where has special drinks/drinks on special tonight?’ “

  12. Sephe says:

    Some type of Chinese dialect I think?

  13. Daydreamer says:

    The solution seems to depend on whether Thai and Lao (and Burmese among others) are considered to be Sino-Tibetan languages.
    If they are not, I’m can’t help thinking that our mistery language is Khmer again (as it was one year ago).

  14. Daydreamer says:

    Oops! The last sentence in my previous comment should read:
    “If Thai and Lao are considered Sino-Tibetan languages (and therefore must be ruled out according to Simon’s clue), I can’t help…”

  15. PP says:

    Daydreamer: No, they are classified as a separate family.

    And according this http://wikitravel.org/en/Lao_phrasebook it cannot be Lao. (no r)

  16. Ian says:

    I made a mistake in my earlier post. It’s a phrase for parties.

    http://www.omniglot.com/writing/lao.htm also shows that there is no ‘r’ sound. There is a letter whose written form is almost the same as the Thai ‘r’ (ร) but is usually pronounced as /l/ (at the beginning of a word atleast). A lot of Thais rather sloppily use this pronunciation too.

    In consonant clusters ‘r’ isn’t seen in Lao e.g. Lao PDR the P is for Pathet (country) whereas the Thai word is Prathet [my transliteration] . This ‘pr’ consonant cluster is in the very first syllable of the sample listening.

    The mistake I made in my first translation was hearing ngaan- lee-ang (งานเลี้ยง) as ngaan-ree-an (งานเรียน)

    (transcript in Thai below)

    ประโยคสำรับงานเลี้ยง ไปเที่ยวกันเธอ จะเจอกันกี่โมงดี ดืนนี้ที่ไหนมีเครืองดื่มรายการพิเศาบั้ง

  17. Ian says:

    I whoops. I meant Pathet Lao and not Lao PDR

  18. Jeremy says:

    that’s definitely thai, which of course means it’s spoken in thailand.
    buuut than again, it could also be lao, but it’s too hard falling to be to me.

  19. Jeremy says:

    ok so sino-tibeatan languages could be thai included, but also could not, depending on what linguists say. hmmm…

  20. Simon says:

    The language is Thai, a Tai-Kadai language which is spoken mainly in Thailand. The recording comes from LanguageTube, a language learning site with YouTube videos.

    Here are the phrases:

    ประโยคสำรับงานเลี้ยง (prayok samrap nganliang)
    = Partying phrases

    ไปเที่ยวกันเธอ (pai tiaw gan thuh)
    = Let’s go out

    จะเจอกันกี่โมงด (ja jergan geemong dee)
    = What time would you like to meet?

    ดืนนี้ที่ไหนมีเครืองดื่มรายการพิเศาบั้ง
    (keunnee theenai mee kreuangdeum raiganphiset bang)
    = What places have good drinks specials tonight?

  21. Mike says:

    It sounds like it’s a text being played backwards

  22. roni says:

    you’ve got some mistakes in your written version of the sentences!

    ไปเที่ยวกันเธอ (pai tiaw gan thuh) = Let’s go out
    should read ไปเที่ยวกันเถอะ, where the last word is changed.
    เธอ means “you” or “her”
    เถอะ is a particle that puts a phrase into the imperative

    จะเจอกันกี่โมงด (ja jergan geemong dee)
    = What time would you like to meet?
    you’re missing the vowel on the last letter. It should read
    จะเจอกันกี่โมงดี

    ดืนนี้ที่ไหนมีเครืองดื่มรายการพิเศาบั้ง
    (keunnee theenai mee kreuangdeum raiganphiset bang)
    = What places have good drinks specials tonight?

    this should read ดืนนี้ที่ไหนมีเครื่องดื่มรายการพิเศษบ้าง
    where เครือง has a tone mark added: เคร่ือง
    พิเศา (phisao) is changed to พิเศษ (phiset)
    and บั้ง is changed to บ้าง (with a longer vowel)