Language quiz

Here’s a multilingual ingredients list from a packet of dried pineapples I bought while in the Czech Republic. How of the languages on it can you recognise?

Multilingual ingredients list from a packet of dried pineapples

As we haven’t had any language quizzes for a while, I thought it was time for one. Also, I’m off to London this evening for a class in Irish Songs and Singing at the Hammersmith Irish Centre, so don’t really have time to write a longer post. I’ll be going to the class every Tuesday for the next 10 weeks and am really looking forward to it.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
This entry was posted in Language.

13 Responses to Language quiz

  1. goofy says:

    Czech, Croatian, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Bulgarian?

  2. Polly says:

    1
    2
    3
    4 Romanian, most likely.
    5
    6 – It’s not russian (too many hard signs), so it must be Bulgarian. Plus, it says “Bulgaria.” :)

    I can’t tell the difference between non-Russian slavic languages!

    Despite the expectation, I don’t think there’s any Hungarian since all the non-ingredient words are related and (mostly) slavic.

    Cyrillic is a lot easier to read than funkified Latin.

    I see that I’m not the only one who studies food labels for language content. I get most of my Arabic and Greek reading practice from near eastern grocery stores.

  3. Daydreamer says:

    I’d go with goofy. Since #1 and #5 are almost identical, they must be Czech and Slovak – or vice versa.

  4. suchosch says:

    #1 is Czech, #5 is Slovak. but it’s not fair from me, because i’m native Czech :)

  5. Halabund says:

    Simon, you should have censored the address of the distributors. It is too easy if you can read Zagreb, Bucuresti, Sofia …

  6. Ben says:

    1 is Czech or Slovak, nobody else has ň. If suchosch says Czech, I’m going to assume Czech

    2 is Croatian (it actually says “Hrvatska” on it)

    3 is Polish (it has ł)

    4 is Romanian (it has ă, plus it says “România” for the importer. One would assume a Romanian importer would be importing into Romania)

    5 is Czech or Slovak for the same reason as 1. Again, I’ll believe suchosch on this one. Slovak.

    6 is Bulgarian, on account of the ъ in vowel positions.

  7. Ben says:

    By the way, are these dried pineapple bits?

  8. Chibi says:

    Well, everyone else has guessed all the answers already, so I’ll say something that’s kind of random but still pertains to the OP…

    I may be weird, but I enjoy these labels that have multiple languages on them (and am upset that we don’t have them in the US…). I bought a bottle of water in Kreuzberg (a district of Berlin that has a large Muslim population), and the label has the ingredients and stuff in an interesting mix of languages (in this order): Turkish, English, German, Danish, Dutch, Arabic. I also have a bag of chips with German, English, Portuguese, Czech, Greek, Polish, Hungarian and Romanian.

    I suppose I’m just not used to labels only having English (and maybe Spanish)…

  9. Jonathan K says:

    Slovak (Czech d’s don’t have any forms with diacritics)
    Croatian
    Polish
    Romanian
    Czech
    Bulgarian

  10. Chibi says:

    @Jonathan K: yes, but Slovak doesn’t have any u-rings (see the third+fourth words of the second line in the first language) or r-haceks. I don’t think any of the d’s have diacritics, it could just be the quality of the image.

  11. Ben says:

    Actually, if you buy any auto parts, they’ve almost always got English, Spanish, and French, at least (in the US, that is)

  12. prase says:

    @Jonathan K: Czech d’s obviously have form with diacritics (háček): Ď ď. However there are not present on the image.

  13. Simon says:

    The languages are: 1. Czech, 2. Croatian, 3. Polish, 4. Romanian, 5. Slovak, 6. Bulgarian. goofy got it right.