Language quiz

Here’s a recording in a mystery language.

Do you know or can you guess which language it’s in and where it’s spoken?

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This entry was posted in Language, Quiz questions.

21 Responses to Language quiz

  1. michael farris says:

    Sounds a lot like the Luxembourgish newscasts I’ve heard, so I’ll guess that.

  2. Tamar says:

    I’m not familiar with Luxembourgish, so I think it’s Dutch. Something about a car crash (due to bad weather) and the financial crisis…

  3. xarxa says:

    a german dialect, something like swiss german/alsatian/allemanisch

  4. Will says:

    I heard New York Times, the West Bank, a whole lot of glottal sounds, and a few interesting other sounds. I will go with Yiddish or another Jewish language.

  5. Greg says:

    I’ll guess Luxembougish as well, also, possibly Frisian.

  6. Miika says:

    Sounds Germanic. I’m going to say Yiddish.

  7. Cefin Gwlad says:

    I’m 99.9% sure it’s Luxembourgish (Lëtzebuergesch): “Gudde Moien” at the top of the bulletin (and, extra-linguistically, the “news sting” music sounds like RTL).

    It’s interesting how similar it sounds prosodically to the Hunsrückisch dialect heard in the German TV series “Heimat” — not surprisingly, I suppose, given the geographical proximity — though Luxembourgish has a much larger French admixture in it.

  8. It’s certainly very close to German dialect and a quick rummage through this website http://wings.buffalo.edu/linguistics/people/faculty/fertig/fertig/GermDialSoundlinks.html
    suggests, as others have pointed out, that this is indeed Luxembourgish/Lëtzebuergesch.

  9. Chris Miller says:

    My thought was Luxemburgish (Lëtzebuergesch) too. Clearly related to German, but without the extra affricates if Schwyzertüütsch or the Alemannic lilt of SD or Elsässisch.

  10. Aron says:

    My guess is also Luxembourgish. It’s reassuring to see that more knowledgeable commentators agree.

  11. philiips says:

    i think its german, luxemburgish flemish or related to these

  12. Christopher Miller says:

    I’d add to this the fact the uvular [ʁ] instead of the [r] typical of Alemannic, and that the [tœʃn̩] I hear after “akzident” is most likely (?) töschen (?) “between”, closer to Dutch “tussen” than High German “zwischen”, it’s petty certain this is a variety of the old West Germanic continuum somewhere along the middle band east of Belgium. I think Lëtzebuergesch is a pretty good bet.

  13. Christopher Miller says:

    …oh, and “New York Times schreift dat” is more lower Rhine-like Middle Franconian phonology on its way to Lower Franconian (Dutch)… In German, “…schreibt, dass” and Dutch, “schrijft dat”…

  14. Cefin Gwlad says:

    You’re quite right, Christopher, about the word meaning “between” that we hear in this recording. The Luxembourgish word is “tëschent” (ë = /e/). It’s heard again (in the report about the Greek financial crisis) in “tëschent Athen”. I think that just about wraps it up, don’t you? :)

  15. Cefin Gwlad says:

    That was meant to be “ë = /ə/” {schwa, in case it dosen’t come out right this time!)

  16. peter j. franke says:

    It´s not one of the Frisian languages, neither it is Dutch. I´m sure it is Luxemburgish- Letzebuergesh…

  17. Petréa Mitchell says:

    Well, I can’t tell anything other than it sounds very German and a smidge Scandinavian to my ear, so I *will* guess Frisian.

  18. d.m.falk says:

    Luxembourgish, most definitely, and it is indeed from RTL Lëtzebuerg (Luxembourg)– I’m listening to that very station on my iPod touch as I type… ;)

    d.m.f.

  19. Simon says:

    The answer is Luxembourgish (Lëtzebuergesch), which is spoken in Luxembourg

    The recording comes from RTL

  20. I travelled there once so guessing it is Luxembourgish…

  21. Vatsala says:

    I am late to the quiz.. but before i saw the comments, I heard it and had a vague idea that it could be related to Dutch or Swedish.. but I dont know either of the languages…. so that was a wild guess anyway…