Archive for the Category: Words and phrases

Muddling through

to muddle through – “to succeed in some undertaking in spite of lack of organization” [source] – “to succeed in doing something despite having no clear plan, method, or suitable equipment” [source] – “to cope more or less satisfactorily despite lack of expertise, planning, or equipment.” synonyms: to cope, manage, get by/along, scrape by/along, make […]

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Also posted in English, Language, Language learning 6 Comments

Skeuomorphs

I came across an interesting word and concept today – the skeuomorph [ˈskjuːəmɔrf], from the Greek σκεῦος (skéuos – container or tool), and μορφή (morphḗ – shape), and defined as “a derivative object that retains ornamental design cues from structures that were necessary in the original” [source]. This term was apparently coined by H. Colley […]

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Also posted in English, Etymology, Greek, Language 2 Comments

Borborygmus

I came across a wonderful word today – borborygmus [bɔrbəˈrɪɡməs] (plural borborygmi) – which refers to a rumble or gurgle in the stomach. It comes from the 16th-century French word borborygme, via Latin from the Ancient Greek βορβορυγμός (borborygmós), which was probably onomatopoetical [source, via The Week]. Are there interesting words for this phenomenon in […]

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Also posted in English, Etymology, Greek, Language, Latin 1 Comment

Hollallu

I came across a wonderful word in Welsh today – hollallu [hɔɬˈaɬɨ] – which means omnipotence or almightiness. It is a portmanteau of (h)oll (all, the whole, everything, everyone) and gallu (to be able (to), have power (to), can, be able to accomplish (a thing)), and there are a couple of variant forms: ollallu and […]

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Also posted in English, Language, Welsh 4 Comments

We need more ning!

Last night at choir one of the songs we were singing ended with the line “in the mor-ning”, with the mor and ning of morning clearly separated and on different notes. One of the tenors made a joke that we needed more ning in the morning, which appealed to me, and I wondered what ning […]

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Also posted in Chinese, English, Language 5 Comments

Found poetry

I went to a poetry recital last night featuring Nia Davies, a Welsh/English poet who lives in Wales, and Hu Dong, a Chinese poet who lives in England. It was part of the North Wales International Poetry Festival. Nia’s poems were all in English, and Hu Dong’s were in Sichuanese, with English and Welsh translations. […]

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Also posted in Chinese, English, Language, Poetry, Turkish, Welsh 1 Comment

Sandwiches and Portsmouths

The sandwich is named after the 4th Earl of Sandwich, John Montagu, who is reputed to have invented it as a convenient way to eat while playing cards. He didn’t come up with the idea of putting meat or filling between two slices of bread, but he certainly popularised it and gave it his title. […]

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Also posted in English, Language 4 Comments

Flierefluiter

The other day I learnt an interesting word in Dutch – flierefluiter – which a Dutch friend described as being a “butterfly type of person”. That is, someone who rarely sticks to or finishes anything. According to the vanDale dictionary flierefluiter is a nietsnut (layabout or someone fit for nothing). According to Dictionarist a flierefluiter […]

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Also posted in Dutch, English, Language 4 Comments

Da mad math

In Welsh and Cornish the usual word for good is da [daː], while in the other Celtic languages words for good are: Breton – mat [maːt˺], Irish – maith [mˠa(ɪ)(h)], Manx – mie [maɪ], and Scottish Gaelic – math [ma]. I’ve wondered for a while whether there were cognates in Welsh and Cornish for these […]

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Also posted in Breton, Cornish, English, Etymology, Irish, Language, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh 11 Comments

Maeldy

I came across an interesting word in my Welsh dictionary – maeldy [ˈmaːɨldɨ̬ / ˈmaildɪ] – which is an old word for shop. The normal Welsh word for shop is siop, which sounds like shop. I had wondered if there was a another word for shop other than the one borrowed from English, now I […]

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Also posted in English, Language, Welsh 2 Comments