Archive for the Category: Manx

Eilean Mhanainn / Ellan Vannin

I just listened to the first in a series of programmes on Radio nan Gàidheal on the Isle of Man (Eilean Mhanainn in Scottish Gaelic, and Ellan Vannin in Manx), which focuses on the Manx language. I found it very interesting, and was pleased to find that I could understand almost all the Scottish Gaelic, […]

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Also posted in Irish, Language, Scottish Gaelic 5 Comments

Summer chicks and glowing coals

Last night we were talking about the Pili Palas on Anglesey, a butterfly centre, which also has birds, snakes and other exotic creatures. The name is a pun combining pili-pala (butterfly) and palas (palace) – it took me ages to realise this. We were trying to think of the words for butterfly in various other […]

Also posted in English, Etymology, French, German, Irish, Italian, Language, Latin, Scottish Gaelic, Spanish, Welsh, Words and phrases 6 Comments

Panceltic concert

Last night I went to a great concert in St John’s (Balley Keeill Eoin) at which all the modern Celtic languages were sung and/or spoken, as well as English and French. It was wonderful to hear them all, and I even understood odd bits of the Cornish and Breton, the only Celtic languages I haven’t […]

Also posted in Breton, Cornish, English, French, Irish, Language, Music, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh 2 Comments

Yn Chruinnaght

At the moment I’m in the Isle of Man for Yn Chruinnaght (‘the gathering’), the Manx National and Inter-Celtic Festival. Yesterday I heard some Scottish Gaelic and odd bits of Manx at a fantastic concert featuring Capercaille and a bunch of local musicians (David Kilgallon and Some Thoroughly Nice Folk), and expect to hear all […]

Also posted in Breton, Cornish, Irish, Language, Scottish Gaelic, Travel 4 Comments

Levees and ganseys

Last night the words levee and gansey came up in conversation and while I’d heard both of them before, I wasn’t entirely sure of the meaning of the former, or the origins of the latter. I did know that a levee had something to with flood prevention and was something you drive your chevy to, […]

Also posted in English, Etymology, French, Irish, Language, Latin, Norwegian, Old Norse, Proto-Indo-European, Scottish Gaelic, Words and phrases 8 Comments

Christmas

Nadolig Llawen Joyeux Noël 聖誕快樂 Nollaig shona doibh ¡Feliz Navidad! Nollick Ghennal Bo Nadal Nollaig chridheil メリークリスマス Buon Natale Frohe Weihnachten Bon Nadal Veselé vánoce and Merry Christmas!

Also posted in Chinese, Czech, English, French, German, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Language, Scottish Gaelic, Spanish, Welsh 18 Comments

Colds, streams and rivers

It’s rather cold here at the moment with daytime temperatures not much above freezing, and nighttime dropping to -10°C (14°F) or even -20°C (-4°F) in places. As a result, some of the snow that fell last week has frozen solid and been trampled down on pavements and ungritted back streets making them decidedly icey and […]

Also posted in Chinese, Czech, English, Etymology, French, German, Greek, Irish, Language, Latin, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Words and phrases 9 Comments

Bœuf

Also posted in Breton, Cornish, English, Etymology, French, German, Irish, Language, Latin, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Words and phrases 7 Comments

Eastáit na Sí

An interesting Irish expression I came across recently is Eastáit na Sí (“Fairy Estates”), which are known as Ghost Estates in English. These are housing estates full of empty houses that nobody can afford thanks to the disappearance of the Celtic Tiger. The Irish version refers to the Sí (fairies or little people) from Irish […]

Also posted in Cornish, English, Etymology, French, Irish, Language, Latin, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh 4 Comments

Cennin Pedr

Yesterday was St David’s Day (Dydd Gŵyl Dewi), a day when many Welsh people wear daffodils (cennin Pedr) in honour of their patron saint. The daffodil (cenhinen Bedr) is one of the national symbols of Wales, along with the leek (cenhinen), and the Welsh name for daffodil means “Peter’s leek”. The leek has been a […]

Also posted in English, Etymology, Greek, Irish, Language, Latin, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Words and phrases 7 Comments