Archive for the Category: English

Just simply

A useful Russian word I learnt this week is просто [ˈprɔstə], which means easily, simply or just. Here are some examples of how it is used: – Нам просто надо выезжать немного раньше обычного. = We just have to leave, you know, a little earlier than usual. – я зашёл просто повидаться = I just […]

Also posted in Language, Russian, Words and phrases 2 Comments

Abounding in fish

I spent the weekend in Devon with my brother and his family. It was my nephew’s first birthday yesterday and I was there mainly to celebrate that. My journey, a long and meadering one, took me through some places with interesting names, such as Exeter, Teignmouth, Dawlish and Paignton. As well as admiring the scenery, […]

Also posted in Etymology, Words and phrases 4 Comments

Rollipokes, ronners and roudges

If I offered you a rollipoke, would you have any idea what it was or what to do with it? This is a word I came across while looking for something else in the Dictionary of The Scots Language / Dictionar o the Scots Leid today. It is defined as, “A sacking of loosely woven […]

Also posted in Language, Scots, Words and phrases 1 Comment

National Motto(e)s

Created with The Keep Calm-O-Matic Do you know your country’s national motto? Not all countries have them. Many are in Latin and other ancient languages, and most are a bit bland and include things like freedom, liberty, unity, strength, work, progress, God, etc. Here are some more interesting ones: – Isle of Man (Latin): Quocunque […]

Also posted in Language, Latin, Luxembourgish, Romanian 3 Comments

Ave a butchers at er barnet

The title of this post is an example of Cockney, a form of speech you might hear in London, specifically in the Cheapside district of the City of London. It includes to bits of rhyming slang – butchers and barnet. Do you know, or can you guess what they mean? To (h)ave a butchers (the […]

Also posted in Danish, Etymology, Language, Norwegian, Old Norse, Proto-Indo-European, Swedish, Words and phrases 4 Comments

Chut-chut

Yesterday I discovered an interesting resource for learning Russian – Russian Podcast, which includes a series of conversations in Russian with transcripts. There are also videos featuring conversations with various people, with subtitles in Russian and English. These are called vodcasts, which is a new word to me. Most of the material is free, but […]

Also posted in Language, Language learning, Russian Comments Off on Chut-chut

Special offer from Rocket Languages

This week Rocket Languges are celebrating their 13th Anniversary with a 4-day sale starting today and continuing until Friday 17th March, or until they’ve sold 1,000 courses. During this time you can get 60% off any of their online language courses, which include: French, Spanish, Italian, Chinese (Mandarin), German, Japanese, Russian, Arabic, Hindi, ASL, Korean, […]

Also posted in Chinese, French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Language, Language learning, Portuguese, Russian, Sign language, Spanish Comments Off on Special offer from Rocket Languages

How to become a language expert in no time

Today we have a guest post from Sebastien Marion As most expats would agree, the best way to learn a language is to go abroad. When abroad, you are immersed in the culture and are forced to speak the language. But whether you are abroad already or trying to improve your language skills from home, […]

Also posted in Language, Language learning, Spanish Comments Off on How to become a language expert in no time

Protagonists and sidekicks

When listening to The Allusionist podcast today I learnt an interesting word – tritagonist, who was the actor who played the third role in ancient Greek drama. Tritagonist comes from the Ancient Greek word τρίτἀγωνιστής (triagōnistḗs), from τρίτ ‎(third) and ἀγωνιστής ‎(combatant, participant). The actors who played the first and second roles in ancient Greek […]

Also posted in Etymology, Greek, Irish, Language, Latin, Proto-Indo-European, Scots, Swedish, Welsh, Words and phrases Comments Off on Protagonists and sidekicks

Pull up a pew

One thing that came up in the French Conversation Group last night was church pews, and particularly how uncomfortable they are. We discovered that in French a pew is un banc (d’église). Banc also means seat or bench, and can mean other things in combination with other words: – banc de sable = sandbank – […]

Also posted in Etymology, French, Language, Proto-Indo-European, Words and phrases 2 Comments
%d bloggers like this: